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Why business leaders need powerful presentations

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July 18th, 2019 Devon Els

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The goal of presenting is to, like Seth Godin said, “change people’s mindsets” and drive action for change. A presentation is powerful when your message is effectively delivered, deeply understood and achieves measurable, sustainable results. According to Gallup Research, only 13% of employees worldwide are engaged at work and you are presenting pie charts to them…

Cut the bull! People don’t come running to see your latest selection of bullet points, graphs and animations. They are there to see you and absorb your knowledge. Your presentation is a delivery tool that supports your message, it is not a memo to read from.

Here’s what makes a powerful presentation:

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1. Connect with your audience

Know who is in the room and whether your message will help or educate each individual there. Give them a reason to give a shit about what you are presenting to them. Your audience is still selfish and needs to know how your message will help them or that their efforts are being seen.

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2. Take me to your leader

Anne M. Mulcahy said, “Employees are a company’s greatest asset,” so showing that you care and support them is essential. You are their leader and your presentations can and will help you lead, if executed with intent. Be authentic as you acknowledge the issues, and it will spark innovation and open doors to new thinking. More than that, it will engage your audience, and that is gold. For business, it means your powerful presentation has pushed the ‘only 13% of employees are engaged’ stat up significantly, which means all sorts of good things: lower staff turnover, more productivity, better customer service, greater innovation, and ultimately a more successful business. Show them you are the leader who wants to, and can, take them there.

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3. “A little less conversation, a little more action please.”

This is the part of the presentation where you sum things up. You take all that you have just presented, wrap it in a bow and hand it over. But just giving a box of cake mix without instructions usually ends with a dry rock in a dish. You have to tell your audience what they need to do to get to where you want to go. You activate them.

The power to bring the transformation and action you’re looking for is in your PowerPoint presentation. However, not every business leader has time to make effective presentations, or if they do, they may not know how to do it as well as they’d like to.

You are the expert in your business, not in presentations, we get that.
Lucky for you, we are.

Contact us today for powerful presentation design.

We can’t wait to help you bring your message across in a meaningful way that brings the lasting change you’re looking for in your organisation.

Posted by Devon Els

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